Sheet1

Instructions:
Open the Correlation Lab Assignment and complete the questions. You will need to review the lab PPT and watch the video tutorials posted on D2L. Follow the steps outlined in the first video tutorial to create two scatterplots illustrating the predicted relationships between: (1) Studying and Organization and (2) Studying and Alcoholic beverages. Follow the steps outlined in the second video tutorial to calculate the r value and p value using VassarStats. Save and upload your assignment to the Lab 4: Correlation submission folder.

Predicted Relationship: Positive Correlation Negative Correlation

Variable: Studying Organization Studying Alcoholic Beverages

Operational Definition: Average hours per week Scale 1-7;
7 = Extremely Organized Average hours per week Average no. consumed
per week

3 6 3 0

4 4.5 4 0

10 5 10 5

22 6 22 0

8 6 8 0

6 4 6 6

6 3.5 6 10

7 4 7 3

25 5 25 0

13 4 13 0

4.5 5 4.5 4.5

20 5.5 20 4

30 6 30 2

20 5 20 2

9 3 9 7

0 6 0 1

35 5 35 4

50 6 50 3

3 3 3 0

25 5 25 0

40 6 40 2

30 5 30 1

27 5 27 0

48 5 48 7

12 5 12 1

24 5 24 0

55 5 55 2

28 5 28 3

35 4 35 0.2

62 6 62 0

30 6 30 0

25 7 25 0

9 3 9 50

3 5 3 0

8 4 8 0

15 6 15 0

40 6 40 0

15 5 15 0

15 6 15 3

20 4.5 20 0

10 4 10 2

7.5 4 7.5 8

3 4 3 0

10 6 10 10

10 5.5 10 2

3 3.5 3 0

3.5 5 3.5 1

4.5 5.5 4.5 0

5 3 5 3

8 6 8 0

9 2 9 0

1 5 1 0

9 5 9 0

15 6 15 4

50 4 50 0

10 4 10 1.5

5 6 5 1

12 5 12 0

26 6 26 0

30 6 30 0

42 6 42 1

5 6 5 7

30 5 30 1.5

3 5 3 0

7 6 7 0

24 5 24 0

8 4 8 0

0 5 0 4

3.5 5 3.5 0.5

11 5 11 0

7 5 7 0

15 3.5 15 0

7 5 7 0

16 4 16 2

16 6 16 1Psychology 110 – Correlation Lab Assignment
Dr. Judy Caldwell, Camosun College

At the beginning of the semester I asked students to complete an Introductory Welcome quiz. In that quiz I asked three questions that we are going to analyze for this assignment.

The three questions were:
a) How many hours per week on average do you typically spend studying?
b) On a scale from 1 to 7, (1 = Not at all organized and 7 = Extremely organized), how organized do you see yourself in general?
c) How many alcoholic beverages do you drink on average per week?

The purpose of asking these questions on the quiz was to generate data that we could analyze for this correlation lab assignment.

Specifically, we can predict how these variables are correlated with each other and test our predictions.

For example, we might predict that the average number of hours studied per week would be positively correlated with how organized somebody sees themselves. In addition, we might predict that the average number of hours studied per week would be negatively correlated with the average number of alcoholic beverages consumed per week.

In this lab we are going to see if these predictions are supported.

Before you get started on this lab, complete these two tasks:
a. Review the Correlation PowerPoint presentation in the Correlation Lab Module.
b. Complete the Lab 4: Correlation Questions posted on D2L using the Quizzes Tool (we encouraged you to use your notes, textbook, and PowerPoints for this quiz).

The data for the three questions from the Welcome Introductory quiz are provided in the Correlation Data Excel file posted in the Corrleation Lab Module. Download and then open this file in Excel.

Use the resources listed below to answer the following questions and then submit your completed assignment sheet to the Lab 4: Correlation Submission Folder. You do not need to submit your Excel file.
These resources are posted in the Correlation Lab Module on D2L:
a. Correlation PowerPoint
b. Scatterplot Video Tutorial

c. Calculating r and p values Video Tutorial

Correlation Lab Assignment Questions

For this assignment we will use the following variables from the Welcome Introductory Quiz.

Positive Correlation:

Variable: Studying Units: Average Hours per Week
Variable: Organization Units: Scale 1-7 (7 = Extremely Organized)

Negative Correlation:

Variable: Studying Units: Average Hours per Week
Variable: Alcoholic Beverages Units: Average Number Consumed per Week

Hint for questions #1 and #2:
Review the Hypothesis Testing section of the Correlation PowerPoint posted in the lab module. This section reviews how to write null and alternative hypotheses for correlational research.

1. What is the null hypothesis for these two correlations?
a) For the positive correlation (studying and organization):

b) For the negative correlation (studying and alcoholic beverages):

2. What is the alternative hypothesis for these two correlations?
a) For the positiveLab #4: Correlational Research
Course Instructor
Judy Caldwell, PhD
Instructional Assistant
Kristina Andrew, MSc

Psych 110: Experimental Psychology

Learning Objectives
In this PowerPoint we will review:
When and why we use correlational research
The characteristics of correlational research
How to accurately identify the strength and direction of correlations represented both numerically and visually
The types of conclusions that can be drawn in correlational research
The limitation of correlational research

Correlational Research

Correlational Research:
Introduction
Correlational research is used when researchers want to explore and describe the extent of the relationship between two naturally occurring variables.
Correlational research examines the strength and direction of the relationship between two naturally occurring variables. In other words, how is a change in one variable associated with a change in a second variable?

Correlational Research:
Introduction
A characteristic of correlational research is that the variables are naturally occurring (i.e., the variables are measured not manipulated).
Naturally occurring variables include any variable that can be measured, such as annual income, IQ Scores, number of pets in a home, number of traffic tickets per year, or grade point average.
Another characteristic of correlational research is that it is descriptive. In other words, it describes the relationship between two variables; it does not explain why to variables are related.

Correlational Research:
Example
Let’s look at an example.
A researcher is interested in describing the relationship between happiness and job productivity.
What type of research study should they use to explore this relationship?
In this case, the researcher would probably want to conduct a correlational study.

Correlational Research:
Operationally Define Variables
As with other types of research, the variables need to be operationally defined (i.e., describes specifically how the variables will be measured).
Imagine you were going to study happiness and job productivity. How might you operationally define these two variables?
To measure happiness, you might create a questionnaire and calculate a happiness score for each participant.
To measure job productivity, you might observe the same participants at work and rate their productivity on a scale.
These are just two examples; there are several other possibilities.

Correlational Research:
When is Correlational Research used?
Researchers sometimes use correlational research when they cannot use experimental research because:
It is not possible to manipulate a variable (e.g., cannot change someone’s age)
It is unethical to manipulate the variables (e.g., unethical to force someone to smoke)

Correlational Research:
When is Correlational Research used?
In other cases, researchers use correlational research as a first step in order to determine if a relationship exists between variables.




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